Tag Archives: hyperion

How to build an Ambilight for every HDMI input source

In this post I’m going to show how you can configure your Hyperion Ambilight for every HDMI source. If you don’t have an Ambilight setup yet, I kindly refer you to my previous guide, which will give you an initial ambilight effect for the media center running on the Rpi.

This guide will then go one step further and enable the ambilight effect for all kind of HDMI input sources like PS3, XBOX, Chromecast etc.

We need to get the color information from an HDMI input signal. For this purpose, it’s necessary to transform the digital HDMI signal to an analog composite one with a converter. After this, we can grab the composite signal with an USB video grabber connected to the Raspberry Pi. Now we’re able to feed Hyperion with the color information by the video grabber.

Parts list

AVR Receiver It’s essential. Most TVs don’t offer an HDMI output
HDMI to Analog converter Speaka Professional HDMI / Composite Converter. There are several others on the market, make sure that you got one with 1080p support. Check this guide for more details about the available chipsets
2 port HDMI splitter My AVR features two HDMI outputs. Otherwise make sure you’ll get one!
USB Video Grabber (Easycap) Make sure you got a grabber with the STK1160 chipset, because it’s fully supported on Linux! Check here for detailed instructions, this can be tricky…I’d recommend a grabber with the UTV007 (Fushicai) chipset. It’s supported with OpenElec >=4.2.1 and features the best results for this purpose.
Composite cabel Just a standard video cinch cabel
Active USB Hub The Raspberry won’t be able to power most of the devices directly from it’s USB port.

Let’s wire it up. Connect the HDMI output from your AVR or from your HDMI splitter to the HDMI / Composite converter input. Use the composite cabel for connecting the USB video grabber with the Composite converter analog output. Plug the USB video grabber into the active USB hub, connect the hub to the Raspberry Pi.

If you already have a running media center then you might already have an analog video output on this machine. In this case, connect the analog output to the grabber, directly. Another possibility would be to go for an DisplayPort to composite converter that connects to the USB grabber. For both solutions, make sure that your existing media center is capable of playing your media to both outputs, simultaneously otherwise you’ll need to go for a 2 port HDMI splitter (without AVR) and HDMI to composite converter.

Here’s my setup connected, ready for video capturing from any HDMI input.

 

1. USB Video Grabber setup

Connect the USB Video Grabber to the Raspberry and type

Unfortunately, my device with “ID 1b71:3002” features a Fushicai UTV007 chip, which is only initial supported with kernel 3.11. This forced me to compile the kernel module myself. If you got the same problem, here’s my precompiled module “usbtv.ko” for Raspbmc with kernel 3.10.36. Make sure you first load the modules “videobuf2-vmalloc” and “videobuf2-core”, than load the module with insmod usbtv.ko.

OpenElec (>=4.2.1) has the driver for Fushicai UTV007 already included, therefore it will work out of the box. Remember, to enable ssh you have to boot OpenElec with TV connected. After that, you won’t need the installed XBMC/KODI anymore. It seems like the current Raspbmc release has the driver not included. SSH to openelec and install hyperion:

Then copy your hyperion.config.json to the shared SMB “Configfiles” folder from your host system. The shared “Configfiles” folder is actually mapped to /storage/.config on the Rpi filesystem. After a Rpi reboot, Hyperion should autostart and load the config from /storage/.config/hyperion.config.json automatically, though.

Remember that you have to set the library path for OpenElec setups before you can execute any hyperion command:

Stop / Restart hyperion manually:

Take a screenshot from the grabber with following command. Remember to kill hyperiond before you can execute this command properly!

For further instructions, make sure to checkout the documentation.

2. Hyperion configuration

Hyperion already features capturing color information from a USB video grabber. Add following configuration to your hyperion.config.json file to enable it.

To adjust the cropping for your setup, you have to change the values “cropLeft, cropRight, cropTop, cropBottom” and make sure “device” matches with your ls /dev/video* output!

Check the created screenshot.png, adjust the crop-* values till the grabbed input has no black borders left. Then put the calibrated values into your /etc/hyperion.config.json file.

Screenshot from my USB grabber input, I was able to get rid of the upper and lower borders by adjusting the cropTop and cropBottom values. I was able to get rid of the green lines after increasing “frameDecimation” to 8 but then a lot of frames were skipped and the LED’s were out of sync to the moving picture. So I set it back to 2.

If you only want to grab the signal from the v4l2 video grabber, make sure that you remove the “framegrabber” and xbmcVideoChecker sections.

Let’s test some videos! If you don’t like the results, try to fine tune your setup with different SignalThresholds or try to adjust the hsv settings. Make sure to read this comprehensive guide about color transformation.

When you switch the HDMI source on your AVR to non HDMI sources, like for example audio only devices, the LED’s will light up in blue. Blue is the default color if no video source was detected for many AVRs. You can disable the LED’s in this situation by setting the blue-threshold value to 1.0.

3. Conclusion

Now you should be able to use your Ambilight for any HDMI input you have connected to your AVR. If you have any question, feel free to ask in the comments section. Enjoy your unleashed Ambilight!

How to build your own Ambilight TV with Raspberry Pi and XBMC

I always wanted one of those colourful glowing large TV screens in my living room but I never felt like paying a fortune for it. So, why don’t do it on my own? I ordered two Raspberry Pis, which seemed like a perfect fit for a media center and a LED controller because of the built in SPI bus interface. After some research, I decided that using SMD LED strips with WS2801 chips would be the best match for a Raspberry Pi controller. Furthermore SMD strips are quite easy to mount, because of the adhesive tape on the back of the strip.

Demonstration

Hardware installation

We’ll setup the necessary hardware first.

Parts list

I’ve ordered following parts to complete the installation from boxtec.ch

1 x 5V LED Pixel Strip 5m (WS2801)
1 x AC adapter 5V/10A
4 x RGB LED Strip – Pigtail Connector 20cm (pair)
1 x Heat Shrink Kit
1 x Breadboard Jumper Wire m-m (65-cable pack)
1 x 1pin dual female jumper wire (300mm) 20pcs.
1 x 5.5 x 2.1mm DC Power Jack Adapter (f)
1 x 2pin dual female jumper wire (300mm) 5pcs.
2 x Raspberry Pi Model B
2 x 8GB SD memory cards
1 x 1A MicroUSB AC adapter

You’ll also need tools for soldering. Alternatively, you could use just one Raspberry Pi, which will act as the LED controller and the media center.

LED power consumption

Regarding the spec sheet, the 5 V LED strip consumes approx. 7.68 Watts per meter or 1.5 A. To calculate the total power consumption, we need to measure how many LEDs we can put on the TV’s back. I needed 3.8 m of the SMD LED strip for my 55 inch TV.

Power supply calculation

Total power consumption: 3.8 m LED strip x 1.5 A + 1.0 A Raspberry Pi Model B = 6.7 A / 33.5 W.

Fortunately, the Raspberry Pi requires also 5V, so you’ll be able to power up the strip and the Pi with the same 5V power supply. Just don’t forget to order a DC Power Jack Adapter for easy connectivity of the at least 7 A / 35 W – 5V power supply.

LED strip soldering

As a Software Developer, I’m not an expert in soldering but I tried to do my best. Cut the strip into 4 pieces that match your TV dimension. For easy replacing of a broken LED strip or moving the installation to another TV connect the stripes with pigtail connectors.

WS2801 LED strips have always four connectors. In my case with those pinouts:

  • 5V
  • GND
  • SD
  • CLK

Be careful, don’t twist those between the pigtails! There’s also an arrow on the strip, which marks input / output. Make sure you’re able to connect the strips from input to output with the pigtail connectors.

It’s easier to solder the connectors to the fine SMD if you put some soldering to each of the four joints in advance. Finish it up with a heat shrink, for more flexibility use non-adhesive heat shrink tubes.

LED mounting

Now, we’re coming to the fun part. It’s barely easy to mount the strips because we chose SMDs, just use the adhesive tape and you’ll be fine. It’s essential that you start mounting from the bottom right, seen from the back of the TV with the arrow on the strip pointing to the right. Later, you’ll connect from the GPIO from the RPI directly to this input of the strip. Then go ahead counter clockwise, connecting the output of the first strip to the input of the second strip and so on until you reach the bottom left. The output of the last strip is left empty, so the strips are not connected in a loop.

LED strip wiring

Wire the LED’s up as shown in the following diagram created by Philip Burgess. Please note, the diagram shown, is for the Rpi revision 1.0. This could slightly change with later revisions. Make sure the input +5V/GND connectors of the strip and the Raspberry Pi power connectors are directly connected to the DC Power Jack Adapter (DC Jack).

Connect WS2801 to Raspberry Pi Model B

 

 

There’s no need for the Pi’s micro USB port anymore. I’d suggest using Breadboard Jumper wires for proper connections to the Pi’s breakout board. Leave the output connectors of the LED strip as they are.

Prototyping: All wires connected to the Raspberry Pi.

Final outcome: Raspberry Pi in black enclosure and power supply wired up.

Software installation

So, the hardware is prepared. In this section I’ll show you how to setup two different applications on the Raspberry Pi to control the LEDs. You have to chose one of them, I’d recommend Hyperion for various reasons.

Hyperion

Hyperion is newer, features a JSON interface and is easier to setup than Boblight. It is also less resource hungry. Therefore we can easily run XBMC and hyperion on the same Raspberry without performance issues.

  1. Install a media center distribution for the Pi. I recommend Raspbmc for beginners, it’s easier to install and less locked down.
  2. Boot up Raspbmc and remote login with your host computer. You’ll find the IP in XBMC under Settings -> System Info. If you’re on Windows, use putty for the ssh connection.

    Prepare hyperion installation
  3. Install hyperion, it will also be added to your autostart.
  4. Now we create the hyperion config file which includes for example the LED position informations. It’s a very readable JSON format. The configuration can initially be generated by a Java tool called “HyperCon”. Have a look at the instructions page. Download HyperCon to your Host computer where Java must be installed. If you followed the LED installation instructions above, the following settings should give you reasonable results for a start. Please adjust the LED counts and the 1st LED offset for your setup on the “Hardware” tab. We want the LED offset to line up with the LED closest to the initial input, which is connected to the Rpi GPIO. Then click “Create Hyperion Configuration” and save the json file to your Desktop. Don’t rename the file.
  5. Let’s copy “hyperion.config.json” to the “pi” user home directory on the Raspbmc. You can easily copy the file by using the shared folder “raspbmc”. Make sure you put it in the folder pi/hyperion. Alternatively you could use SCP for copying the file.
  6. Back on the Raspbmc ssh shell, copy the configuration file to the place where it will actually be picked up by hyperion at boot.
  7. We’re nearly finished. Hyperion grabs the color information directly from XBMC over an interface running on port 9090. We configured this in HyperCon, tab “External”. By default, this remote interface is disabled. In XBMC goto Settings -> Services -> Remote Control and activate both options. Reboot the system.
  8. We’re finished, play a movie or display some pictures and the LEDs should light up. The LED are disabled in the menu, you could easily change this setting in /etc/hyperion.config.json, look for “xbmcVideoChecker”.
  9. If you’d like to use the LED as mood lights simply install following excellent app and point it to the Raspberry Pi with port 19444: Hyperion for Android. For non Android users, there’s also a web app available.

 

Boblight

I’d recommend using ArchLinux as distribution for the Raspberry Pi, it boots in less than 10s to the command line.

  1. Go to http://archlinuxarm.org/platforms/armv6/raspberry-pi and follow the instructions.
  2. Boot up the Pi and remote login: ssh root@raspberryip password is root.
  3. Create a new directory and switch:
  4. We’ll install a resource optimised version of boblight for archlinux.

    This will install all required packages for the boblight installation.
  5. Let’s checkout the optimised boblight source.
  6. Next commands will actually install boblight.

    Now, configure ld.

    Lets configure Boblight as a deamon so it will autostart after Archlinux was booted.

    Register the script as a deamon.

    Boblight should now be installed and running in the background. For more details, have a look overhere: https://github.com/werkkrew/boblight-archarm#installing
  7. Now generate the boblight config file. Switch to the boblight checkout directory create on step 3 and make the config script executable.

    Then execute the script

    The script will ask you for the exact LED count mounted on each side of your TV. Use the default values for all other inputs. Wait till the script is ready, then copy everything between “——- Light section starts here ——” and  “——- Light section ends here ——” into a text file on your host machine (Not on your Pi). Write down the total LED count.
  8. Download this preconfigured  config file: SPI-WS2801-basic and open it with a texteditor on your host machine. Add your generated light section simply to the end of the file. Multiply your total LED count by 3 (RGB channels) and replace “369” with your result in the file. Then select all and copy.
  9. Create the actual boblight config file with

    on your Pi and paste the content of your modified config file on the host machine into it, this will take some time to complete.
  10. Lets test the LED config.

    Check the output for errors.
  11. We’re getting closer, try firing the LEDs up. boblight-constant BB55AA  All LEDs should light purple.

boblight-dispmanx installation

So, we’ve managed getting boblight to control our LEDs. Now, we’ll see how to setup another tool for sending captured screen color information right to our boblight deamon, it’s called boblight-rpi. Perform the following steps on the Raspberry Pi, that will be running the media center. A media center for example XBMC, running on this Pi will act as the video input source. Everything played on XBMC will be captured by boblight-dispmanx and sent to boblight.

  1. Install the newest version of OpenELEC (XBMC distribution) on your Pi: http://wiki.openelec.tv/index.php/Installing_OpenELEC_on_Raspberry_Pi#tab=Linux
  2. SSH to the OpenELEC Pi:

    Checkout the source code

    Set execution permissions to the precompiled boblight-dispmanx binary.
  3. We have to configure the tool to actually send the captured screenshots of the TV screen to your Pi Boblight server. Create an autostart script:

    Paste following sample config into the file.

    Don’t forget to replace the {placeholder} with the IP of your boblight running Pi or set it to “localhost” if you went for one Raspberry Pi. Then save the script and make it executable with
  4. We’re done, just restart the system
  5. Check the setup with a RGB test video. If you think the colours are to pale, try a higher value for the “-o saturation” parameter. When the lights are to slow, try setting “-o speed” to 90. If you don’t like the LED’s in the XBMC menu, just remove the “-b” parameter.

Conclusion

This is a really educational project, which will give insight into a lot of interesting technical areas reaching from compiling in the Linux shell to soldering and calculating LEDs power consumption.

For now, you’re bound to XBMC as media source for ambient light your environment. If you want to go a step further and use every HDMI input signal as media source, have a look at this how to: How to build an Ambilight for every HDMI input source

If you have any question, feel free to ask in the comments section. Enjoy your ambilight!